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20140226
20140306
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religion or afghanistan and we prided ourselves on being opinions and existentialists and beat max and artistes. and he never prepared me for what his life would be if you never told me that his father had three wives and 21 children, and that i would be expected with my mother-in-law. and that women were still wearing burqa is, even though there was reform underway and he never mentioned this and it never came out. when we landed there, they smoothly took away my passport. and i said that as my american passport. and they said oh, it's a formality, we will send it to your home. and i never saw the passport again and that becomes an entire chapter in the book because at that moment i became a citizen of no country with no rights in the property of a large and polygamist muslim family. and i thought the is would be romantic, we would travel throughout all of central asia. i found myself instead transported back to the 10th century with no passport back to the future. i lived gender apartheid long before the taliban came to power. and i understand that that, may indeed, have turned m
saying religion has to be crucial for education. can't separate these two so consequently our response is we need to have the readings of the catholic bible under the direction of priests in public-school score give us money to fund our own parochial schools so we can have an integrated religious education and neither side could actually see the merits of the other side in this debate. it was highly contentious and tore apart communities throughout the nineteenth century on how to resolve this issue. supreme court for standard this debate about school prayer in 1948 in a case dealing with relief time. relief time was actually an interesting modification to respond to complaints about school sponsored prayer and bible reading in public schools as a way of accommodating all groups from ministers in gary, indiana in the 20th century, let's not have the schools be responsible for religious education, let's put aside a time during the day, and allow each religious community to bring in teachers or ministers to the children of that faith. and religious education on site. and in the first par
? or--or religion--how--how can religion help to reinvigorate american democracy? or schools--what can the school--what role can schools play in--in trying to fix this problem? c-span: what is the status of religion? >> guest: religion is--as a whole, religious participation is down, as everything else is, in terms of social connections. down about, oh, 25 percent over the last--that is, take going to church, for example, is down by about 25 percent over the last 25, 30--30 years. but, obviously, there are some parts of the religious spectrum that have had ena--enormous growth during this period. and there are others that have had substantial falls. i mean, the mainline protestant churches, for example, and--and--and--and attendance at mass among catholics, has dropped off a lot. but that's t--partially offset by the growth and participation in evangelical communities. and what we were talking about in the saguaro seminar was, well, ok, su--suppose we were to have a--another one of these what people call great awakenings, which we've had periodically in american history, where people b
more. and we will even get rid of them. but the catholics said that we think religion has to be crucial. we cannot separate these two. and we even need to have the readings under the direction of the public schools be a part of this. and we can have an integrated religious education. and neither side could see the merit from the other side and it was again highly contentious and it tore apart communities throughout the 19th century on how to resolve these issues. the supreme court first entered this debate about school prayer in 1948 in a case dealing with release time. it's actually an interesting modification as a way of kind of accommodating all groups. and let us put aside the time during the day, and we will allow each religious community to bring in one of their teachers and administrators from the children of that faith. and that became a common practice for the first part of the 20th century. and in the north and the west as well, it became a common thing. the supreme court heard a case on that of the first true modern case and they found not to be unconstitutional because it wa
as the religion of the land. so this was a big occasion, the 10th anniversary. all the bishops were summoned and mussolini's own representatives would be there, the king's son would be there, the world would be watching. it was a speech that the the pope saw as his last opportunity to get out a crucial message, a dramatic message. if i can just. i don't know how to work this. one button which doesn't seem to do anything. i'm just going to show you a couple of images to illustrate this -- yeah, that's what we are trying to do. i don't want to keep you there. this is a, shows had been so robust. this is in his last 10 days or so of his life what he looked like. if you go to the next image, you see both as younger men, at the time they both came to power in 1922, which is the beginning of my story. benito mussolini is 39-year-old. a rabble-rouser, a bully, aficionado of violence. he would come to power by leading his, kind of ragtag troops in a march on rome and through kind of extortion come to power at the end of 1922, just a few months after the pope came to power. the dictator came to depen
that part is impressive. but the other side is the raising of a new terrorist. this is not about religion necessarily all that is central but look at the faces of the irish republican army, there is always a process of regeneration. i don't know we are losing but we're not making headway. good people right here have talked about public diplomacy for years but we're not showing some new arguments and imagination and determination believe need to make that succeed so we have made very little progress. this administration will not do better than the last one on public diplomacy. >> id your strategy area you don't mention the other programs of the capabilities that take a lot of money. you mentioned the cuts of the bush and administration what idiocy of of these non kinetic programs and funding levels of? >> thank you. you were careful to say on the skin you had not seen that but on a close reading you will see that and be happy to know there is day section what we can do with strategy and our partners can catch terrorists also. you are right i know how you spend your career at state with the
. he talked about freedom of religion, religious tolerance we have the first amendment freedoms, speech, press, assembly, religion. freedom to immigrate. think about that. when ronald reagan was president, everybody behind the iron curtain last the freedom to integrate. you couldn't go over the iron curtain. the secretary of defense anytime i ever mentioned the iron curtain to an audience, he said this to me shortly before he died if you're going to be around longer than me, do me a favor. any time you mentioned the berlin wall as your audience is one question. in whicquestion. in which correction to the east german guards who control the berlin wall in which direction they point their gun class east. on their own people. you're talking t to secretary defends the walls are built to keep the enemy from invading. this was a wall to keep people that wanted to be free from leaving. it had borrowed why you're over top. peter robertson that growth the tear down this wall speech, when he was pairing to write a speech there was gravel and it was fair so that a footprint seen there the night bef
of religion, religious tolerance. we have a first amendment freedom can, speech, press, assembly, religion. the freedom to emigrate. think about that. when reagan was president, everybody behind the iron curtain lacked the freedom to emigrate. you couldn't, you know, you couldn't go over the iron iron curtainment reagan's secretary of defense, cap weinberger, anytime they ever mentioned the iron curtain to an audience, he said this to me about a year before he died, you're going to be around longer than me. do me a favor, anytime you mention berlin wall, ask your audience this one question: in which direction did the east german guards who patrolled the wall, in which direction did they point their guns? right? east. on their own people. he said, you're talking to a former secretary of defense. walls are usually built to keep an enemy from invading. this was a wall to keep people who wanted to be free from leaving. it had barbed wire over the top of it. peter robinson, who wrote the tear down this wall speech said he flew other with the military when -- over with the military, and there wa
? >> i am not sure how relevant it was but these think religion will be preserved? i know it seems doubtful. >> i don't think so but there is a woman named a and forest a theologian when i saw kismet at m.i.t. righty about that issue. but if we create things with seoul's that we needed a guide for how to treat them those guides are the old testament and other text. did they develop spiritual wonder? >>. >> to come across descriptions with those that can take almost all the emotion out and the end result was the same. people like that are very indecisive they cannot make up their minds because the motion gives the drive to do things. karen they replicate the emotion and the drive? >> that is a great question. i think based on what has been written and he is so positive pcs positive outcomes. he will see their goal driven one of the definitions of intelligence so they will not lacks the drive but pursuing something in original programming. i am not sure that is connected to the motion. where we might have the basic drive to be satisfied. but his a answer would be the machines are dri
religion isn't involved, these fights are all over land. so there has to be land c conflict. if the world came together, we mind need outside force. so that is probably not the answer you were looking for, but i don't know how else to put it. >> i have to apologize, i haven't read the book, but listening to your presentation, when you talk about the sioux, you mentioned the seven council fires and they divide up into three divisions, with the tee-time being one which has seven subdivisions and i hope you put that into book. and listening to you talk about the mutilation and the scalpings and it sounded line a common practice. bus this was something that was imposed upon them as well. [inaudible talk] >> i don't know what you mean by imposed upon. >> i mean exactly what you are saying -- >> the american indians were doing this to each other before they met others. >> anyways, the way you said it made it sound like we were the only ones doing it. and then also, it is great that you give credit to red cloud uniting the empire but there were other native leaders from many of the subdivision >
on religion or race or anything. we have to routes is out and make sure this doesn't ever happen again. people don't feel like it can happen. recommendations are an important part of that. we look forward to additional recommendations. the second topic, has come up today, what is the irs doing to ensure that it has better resources with taxpayer concerns to ensure the phone is being picked up and the chair made the comment, your data, the responses are pretty weak. and i would like to maybe turns this, not enough people to answer all the questions or concerns taxpayers have court is the problem that the code is so cumbersome and riddled with exemptions and loopholes and problems that average everyday working americans could possibly attempts to figure out as they hire accountants and lawyers and we have 4 million words in this code and it grows by the second with the regulatory side as well. the problem we need more people to answer the problems americans have with the code or the problem is the code itself? >> it is all of the above. i will defer to ms. olson in a moment but it is a 0 sum gam
that there's even beyond literacy there was a sense that islam was a prophetic religion that had a strong ethos of solidarity and social justice that i think helped enslaved peoples survive in all sorts of ways. >> how conscious other than people like the traders and the viceroy, how conscious were sort of the people of the, the white people of the americas i guess who respect the people of the -- who aren't the people of the americas that they were muslims? was that part of the perception of it all or all the same that they just came from somewhere else and had their own -- >> i think it wasn't a problem until it became a problem, you know? if it was -- so in the largest urban slave rebellion in americas in history was led by, was -- had very strong participation by muslims in 1835. and that became very much part of the counterinsurgent response of, you know, islam as a problem. from the beginning, again, from nearly the first early uprisings and movements for resistance muslims often iewfed as a problem. -- identified as a problem. and spanish authorities were constantly issuing edicts
for a great presentation. my question is about your presentation, how does religion affects different styles? i am wondering if you talk to different diversity programs on those different campuses and how activism affects different things. >> in much the same way that we didn't find major differences in adoption among students who were fiscally conservative or socially conservative, we did see religious students and nonreligious students on each campus more or less adopted similar -- they fell into the style. that was typical of their campus, this was among women, this was in part because we studied women more carefully, we wrote a whole chapter on what we called conservative femininity. we doing is to -- interviews around the time, we were doing these interviews around the time that sarah palin was on the ticket so there is a lot of conversation about what it meant to be a conservative woman. really interested to come to understand to be a conservative woman is to be feminine, and to despise liberal feminism because liberal feminism is narrowing the opportunities for women and directing the
of the death penalty." that press release also said, "mumia ab abu-jamal's death sentence are religionics of a time and place that was notorious for police and race discrimination. they held rallies and protests. this is advocacy. this is political advocacy. this is extreme and radical advocacy. this is not legal representation. they even went so far as to travel to france, to hold multiple rallies for abu-jamal. the french had already named a street after abu-jamal in a suburb of paris. this prompted the house of representatives in 2006 to vote 368-31 to condemn the murder of officer daniel faulkner and to earth the french town to -- and to urge the french town to change that street name. after phaging those flames of racial tension in the court of public opinion, adegbile pressed aggressive arguments on flais our courts of law. thankfully, the state and federal courts rejected those arguments. under adegbile you the l.d.f. initially argued in court that abu-jamal's death sentence should be overturned because he believed there should have been more for instance on -- after cang americans
. afghans may be divided by ethnicity, language and religion but they don't seem to be experiencing gridlock. the current presidential campaign does not evidence polarization, but rather the opposite. as public debates are surfacing, more agreement than discord on all major issues facing that country. according to a recent asia foundation survey, 76% of afghans believe they are better off today than they were under the taliban. again, i think the american figures for americans would be much lower. and it is easy to see why the afghans feel this way. between 2000 two and 2012, afghanistan experienced a greater improvement in health, in education, and in overall standard of living than did any other country in the world as measured by the u.n. development program. in education, literacy has increased from 12% of the population to 30%. in 2:00, an estimated 900,000 boys were in school and virtually no girls. today there are over 10 million children in school, nearly 40% of whom are girls. the number of teachers increased from 20,000 in 2002 to 175,000 today. higher education has also boomed. ac
or religion" or have -- quote -- "antipathy toward people who aren't like them." when i served in the house of representatives in 2009 speaker nancy pelosi said in a town hall meeting in august of this year that those with concerns about obamacare, those with concerns about obamacare were -- quote -- "un-american." no one has the right to determine whose believes are american or un-american. certainly no one in the united states house of representatives or the united states senate. it's troubling that there is a reflexive reaction in congress to label critics as unloyal. recognizing disagreement is part of the decision-making process of our democracy and arpful die long between all americans is critical to a well-functioning republic. certainly anything short of that is not worthy, is not worthy of the senate floor. i'm weary of the repeated attempted to distract the american people from the rollout and poor performance of obamacare. this week "the new york times" poll -- new york/cbs poll found that only 6% of americans believe that obamacare is working well and should be kept in place as
a symbol of racial injustice. it said, abu-jamal's conviction and death sentence are religionics of a time and -- and relicarereligionics of a time ae -- of relics of a time and place of discrimination. an l.d.f. lawyer attende attendd rallies for abu-jamal. she said it was absolutely an honor to do so. she said, floss qui in the mind of -- there is no question in the mind of anyone at l.d.f. that the justice system has totally failed abu-jamal. this demagoguery of the murder of a defenseless police officer has shocked and offended law enforcement officers from across the country. the current district attorney of philadelphia, seth williams says, "apart from being patently false, moreover, these chambers are personally insulting to me. as an african-american, i know all too well the grievous consequences of racial discrimination and prejudice. i also know that abu-jamal was convicted and sentenced because of the evidence -- because of the evidence, not because of his race. i've continued to fight for the jury's verdict because it was the justice result." district attorney williams notes th
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)